Tag Archives: World Endurance Championship

FIA WEC

Seeing through the Spray in Shanghai

Seeing through the spray at the FIA WEC 6 Hours of Shanghai

The 2018 leg of the FIA World Endurance Championship 2018/19 ‘Super Season’ is now over. There are three races left and a whole lot still to play for. The weekend in Shanghai certainly had a different feel to it, with far more positivity across the four classes than we’ve seen all season. The racing was good; albeit in tough conditions, and has left us with plenty to look forward to when the season resumes next March at Sebring.

More poor weather
Once again the FIA WEC had to battle through poor weather conditions in China. Heavy rain and low visibility were the order of the day for the race and that prevented the race from running for the entire six hours. However, the race officials once again excelled themselves in making smart, prompt decisions to keep the race going as long as possible.

FIA WEC
The red flags had to make two appearances in the race, which even started under safety car conditions. But the second half of the race ran smoothly, and actually, produced some memorable action as the weather improved. The only real issue the organisers were left to tackle was the fading light at the end of the race, which saw rain and darkness produce an alarming finish to the race for many of the drivers mid-pack who struggled to fight through the spray.

GTE Pro producing the goods
The best racing was found in the GTE Pro class, once again, and it’s clear that the class is becoming closer between the five marques taking on the full season. Not only was the racing door-to-door, but it produced a historic result too, with Aston Martin Racing’s new Vantage AMR scoring its first ever win. Nicki Thiim and Marco Sorensen in the No.95 were the victors and were masterful in the tricky conditions, aided by strategy calls from the team. Thiim, in particular, had an impressive run in the second half of the race, storming through the field from fourth in the fifth hour after the safety car for the ByKolles CLM catching fire on the pit straight to take control of the race, before Sorensen kept his cool at the end.

FIA WECBehind the Aston, Richard Lietz steered the No.91 Porsche to second in the class after getting past Tom Blomqvist’s No.82 BMW (which faded away), Davide Rigon’s No.71 Ferrari and Alex Lynn’s No.97 Aston Martin (which fell to fourth) during his stint. The championship-leading No.92 Porsche meanwhile, finished up third, pushing the No.97 to fourth at the very end, when Michael Christensen muscled his way past Maxime Martin in the dash to the flag after the final safety car period.

The key here is that Aston Martin is now very much in the fight. BMW has work to do. Its car is quick in the right conditions, but struggles when things get changeable. While AMR would need a remarkable run through Sebring, Spa and Le Mans next year to get in the title hunt, the British team building up to a title challenge in 2019/20 will be the priority.

It must be mentioned that Corvette ran in China, making its first FIA WEC appearance (Le Mans aside) since CoTA 2014. While Oliver Gavin and Tommy Milner enjoyed the challenge of taking on the FIA WEC’s Pro field, on unfamiliar ground, it wasn’t easy. Despite making bold strategy calls during the race in an attempt to gain any sort of advantage, they failed to feature and finished eighth. Neither driver could extract enough pace out of the C7.R to keep up in the mixed conditions.

LMP1 getting closer
LMP1 is tightening up, with Equivalence of Technology changes before the race helping keep the privateers within arm’s length for the first time. The race itself, unfortunately, didn’t give us a true flavour of what’s to come, because Toyota won comfortably again, in part because the race didn’t run for the full six hours, and the weather was poor.

FIA WECHowever, in qualifying, it was tight. The pole-winning car this time was the No.7 Toyota TS050 HYBRID, which went on to win, after Mike Conway and Kamui Kobayashi combined to set a pole-winning 1:42.931. Between the fastest Toyota and privateer, though, it was as tight as it’s been this season. The No.1 Rebellion R-13 came closest, Andre Lotterer and Bruno Senna taking third with a 1:42.218s, which put them just over two tenths off pole, and less than a tenth off the No.8 Toyota which ended up second on the grid with a 1:43.159s. The headline time from the duo came from Lotterer, whose last-ditch attempt to take pole saw him reel off a 1:42.869s, which proved to be the second-fastest single lap time of the session. Could we see a privateer take pole of the season, and really challenge for a win? It’s beginning to look that way!

GTE Am turned on its head
GTE Am has seen major change over the past two weeks. The once dominant No.88 Dempsey Proton Porsche has had all of its points stripped after an investigation into data tampering, meaning it’s now a wide-open title race now. Team Project 1 has taken over at the top of the classification now; an impressive feat in its first year, but there are only 20 points between the German outfit and its nearest challenger, the No.98 Aston Martin Racing Vantage. With Sebring and Le Mans worth more than standard points, one slip up could see the points tally have a very different look by the end of the season.

FIA WECAnd that’s exactly what we want, both GTE classes producing close racing and thrilling title battles.
See you in Sebring!

Written by Stephen Kilbey
Photography by Dailysportscar.com 

FIA WEC

Looking ahead to Fuji

Looking ahead to the FIA WEC 6 Hours of Fuji

The FIA World Endurance Championship “Super-Season” continues this weekend in Japan, with the first non-European flyaway of the year. The race at Fuji Speedway is one of, if not THE, most popular rounds of the season among traveling fans, media and the teams. It is a stunning country, with a lot of character, and a motorsport history and culture many nations aspire to. Fuji Speedway itself is a real test; it’s a circuit with a near-endless pit straight, as well as a mixture of medium and slow speed corners. When rain doesn’t intervene, (we’ll get to that later), it provides thrilling racing. We hope that tradition continues this weekend, as the FIA WEC heads to the sleepy town of Gotemba for the seventh year in a row.

Will the Equivalence of Technology changes give us a race in LMP1?
While the points standings tell a different story, the on-track action in the LMP1 class this year has failed to live up to the extremely high bar set over the past four or so years. Toyota, being the powerhouse it is, has dominated, in every facet, and only really faces a threat from the No.3 Rebellion R-One in the points standings because both its TS050 HYBRIDs were disqualified from the race at Silverstone after finishing first & second.FIA WECIn order to combat that, the ACO and FIA has opted to change the Equivalence of Technology in the class (with the approval from Toyota), to try and give the privateer field a bit more of a chance. Whether or not the difference will be significant though, is still very much up for debate. For this weekend’s race, the Toyotas will run with more ballast, putting weight in the cars the only real way to make a key difference in the disparity on the pace-front over the course of the race. In addition to that, the privateer’s artificial restriction on stint length (lap cap), which was quietly dropped at Silverstone has now been officially thrown out. Before, the non-hybrids were forced to pit more often and for longer than their hybrid counterparts; it was a decision which was originally made to help along the image of the Toyotas being more efficient. Understandably, there was a lot of feedback, and after three dominant showings from Toyota, clearly a change was needed.

Any time a private outfit takes on the resources of a huge corporation like Toyota, it is never going to be a fair fight. Few were under the illusion that the privateer prototypes, of which all but one were brand new at the start of the season, would be able to go toe-to-toe with the impressive, and proven TS050. But a sniff of competition is still needed to keep it at the very least interesting. We will see this weekend if Rebellion can continue to mount a title challenge and beat Toyota without post-race penalties. It will be tough, especially as Toyota has won at Fuji five out of six years. But, if they can, then the rest of the ‘Super Season’ will look far more interesting!

Will this be BMW’s big weekend?
It’s fair to say that so far this season, BMW has had a quiet showing with its new M8 GTE in the FIA WEC competition. The German marque, which has secured strong finishes with its parallel IMSA programme, but in the WEC there’s been little to shout about. A bit of a factor is of course the Balance of Performance that governs the class. This year, the second for the new automated system, it has not quite provided us with the parity seen in 2017. But, with new machinery, comes new challenges, and it appears that the FIA and ACO’s system is going to attempt to rectify that. BMW will benefit from a lighter car, and an increase in boost pressure. The MTEK-run Bavarian crew will hope that this is enough to see them earn a podium for the first time in the WEC.FIA WECElsewhere in GTE Pro, Aston Martin is looking for a similar change in form, though it heads to Japan with no change to its Vantage AMR’s Balance of Performance. That may seem strange, when you consider that like BMW, Aston’s new toy has yet to earn any silverware, but let’s not forget that at Silverstone, early in the race, the signs were there that the car can compete in its current state. If the change isn’t enough, then Ford, Porsche and Ferrari will again be the contenders here, with their proven machinery, that already has experience of Fuji under their belts.

WIll Alpine’s Le Mans news push them towards a big finish in Fuji?
The biggest LMP2 story since Silverstone has been the Le Mans results being confirmed. Alpine now officially has won the LMP2 class after G-Drive Racing/TDS Racing’s failed appeal. Thoughts and feelings about the process and length of time the FIA Court of Appeal’s decision took to be made aside, this is a huge bit of news. This means that the French team has two LMP2 wins at Le Mans in three years to its name, and heads to Fuji with the championship lead.FIA WECAt Silverstone, Jackie Chan DC Racing rediscovered its 2017 form and scored a memorable 1-2, but don’t expect things to come so easy this time round. There will be plenty to play for here, especially with the weather set to be a factor again. Watch out for Racing Team Nederland’s Dallara here, if there is lots of Full Course Yellows and safety cars and the team can burn Frits Van Eerd’s driving time early, then the combination of Guido van der Garde, Nick De Vries and Michelin tyres on the Dallara could be a lethal one, and spring a surprise.

Rain, rain, go away
Due to the time of year the 6 Hours of Fuji is held each season, weather is always a talking point before the weekend, and often proves to be a factor. Last year heavy rain meant much of the race was spent under Safety Car conditions or a red flag, which was a real shame, especially when considering that in the past we had a race that only lasted 16 laps because of the conditions track-side deteriorating so much, so fast.FIA WECThe forecast as it stands doesn’t look good, but it can change quickly. Some members of the paddock will welcome light rain to spice things up, but many will spend the whole meeting praying that it stays completely dry, as Japan is a long way to go to sit under an umbrella.

Can anyone stop Proton?
A win at Le Mans, and at Silverstone has given Christian Ried, Julien Andlauer and Matt Campbell a comfortable lead in GTE Am. The trio, who pilot the No.77 Proton Porsche 911 RSR now hold a 33-point advantage over Clearwater Racing’s crew of Keita Sawa, Matt Griffin and Weng Sun Mok. Project 1 Racing are third, a quiet but encouraging run through the opening races of the season leaves Egidio Perfetti, Jorg Bergmeister and Patrick Lindsey in 35 points back, with a chance to vault themselves into the title race at the halfway point of the season.

Like LMP2, the points are the same in the Drivers and Teams standings. GTE Am’s Balance of Performance changes aren’t as extensive as Pro, with just small weight changes made to the Porsches and Aston Martin Vantage GTEs. The two cars are now due to race with an extra 10 and 5kg respectively. It will be interesting to see how the Ferrari teams benefit, especially an outfit like Clearwater, which should shine at Fuji. Weng Sun Mok has a ton of experience racing there over the years, and Keita Sawa is an instructor at the circuit.

Written by Stephen Kilbey
Photography by Dailysportscar

The FIA World Endurance Championship continues in the 2019 at Sebring, followed by Spa-Francorchamps and Le Mans. Travel Destinations will be at all these events and you can join us too. Click on the event name above to learn more.

WEC

How it stands in the FIA WEC

The state of the FIA WEC “Super Season” after three rounds

The 2018/19 FIA WEC ‘Super Season’ has been a strange one so far. With a strong grid littered with world-class talent, a good number of entrants in each class and close title races in three categories, it has not been without intrigue in the European races to open the season. There are plenty of talking points up and down the order, as the series looks ahead to the flyaway rounds at Fuji and Shanghai to round off the calendar year.

Toyota dominant, but not in the points standings
Up to this point, Toyota Gazoo Racing, perhaps unsurprisingly, has been far and away the best team in the LMP1 class. With years of running under its belt, and a tried and tested year-old TS050 HYBRID at its disposal, the Japanese marque’s quality has really shown this year against privateer opposition. As many would have predicted, it has been a David v Goliath-type affair. But the Equivalence of Technology debate has raged on from the Paul Ricard Prologue, all the way through to the week after Silverstone, as artificial regulations have left Toyota with the upper hand in both performance terms, and in the sporting regulations. Until Silverstone, the privateers were forced to pit earlier than Toyota in each stint, and spend longer refueling, meaning even if they were on pace with the TS050s, they would still lose precious seconds at multiple points during the race.

FIA WECSo to put it lightly, it has been a rough ride for the privateers. Rebellion’s R-13s have been reliable, and quick, but not enough to challenge, SMP Racing’s BR1s have proven to be fragile, ByKolles’ CLM despite an up-curve in performance is still way off, DragonSpeed’s season has been marred by big incidents at Spa and Le Mans thus far, and CEFC TRSM (due to financial difficulties) has only taken part in one race.

The cars themselves, in isolation, are solid, and with such a high standard of drivers behind the wheel, they are impressive when you consider just how quick the class went from a single entrant to eight; all it took was collective ambition from multiple parties, and just one off-season. Make no mistake, these are the most sophisticated and head-turning bits of LMP1 Privateer machinery in FIA WEC history, but they are no match for the factory cars; at least not yet!

Despite all that though, the title race is extremely tight at the top, after Toyota lost its Silverstone 1-2 after its cars were disqualified for failing post-race technical checks.  That outcome meant that the No. 3 Rebellion R-13 of Gustavo Menezes, Mathias Beche and Thomas Laurent inherited the win and have closed the gap to just two points. Despite its rather disappointing circumstances – no podium celebration for the team to experience – it is still a significant milestone for the championship. The win is not just the first privateer overall win in FIA WEC history, but the first non-hybrid win since 2012. And in terms of drivers, Menezes became the first American to win a FIA WEC race outright, and amazingly, the first American to win the Tourist Trophy – the oldest prize in motorsport.

The question now is, will the title race still be close when the series heads to Sebring next year? It is all down to regulations, as if it continues as it is now Toyota will still stroll to the title. But if the ACO can find a way to balance the hybrid and non-hybrid cars to the point where the privateers, whose cars are less efficient and slower through traffic without hybrid boost have a legitimate shot of winning, then fans will flock to races.

Porsche on top in GTE Pro
No LMP1 programme? No problem for Porsche, who are creating a fine set of headlines in the GTE ranks this year, after a popular GTE Pro win at Le Mans, and a consistent run from its No.92 911 RSR at Spa and Silverstone. Atop the drivers’ standings, are Le Mans winners Kevin Estre and Michael Christensen, who have accumulated 71 points. Their lead is relatively comfortable, as the gap back to Ford’s Silverstone winners Olivier Pla and Stefan Mucke is now 14 points. Despite not taking part in Silverstone, Billy Johnson, Pla and Mucke’s teammate for Spa and Le Mans, is third with 48 points, while Silverstone victors Alessandro Pier Guidi and James Calado are fourth on 43.5. While the gap to the leaders for BMW and Astons best placed drivers may seen cavernous, it must be remembered that there are still five races to go, one of them being the second Le Mans of the season, which hands out 1.5x the standard points.

WECIn the GTE manufacturers race, it’s Porsche leading with 177 points, over Ford with 77. Ferrari is third with 71. But the big talking point here, hasn’t been the spectacular racing, instead it’s the ever-present elephant in the GT racing room: Balance of Performance. The current automated process, is, categorically better than the previous methodology used by the series organisers to create parity, but it is not perfect. This is evident in the results achieved by BMW and Aston Martin. BMW’s new M8 GTE, which has now won a race in IMSA as part of Team RLL’s parallel programme, has struggled for pace, particularly in the races, where it has at times been wildly off. Aston Martin meanwhile, struggled at Spa and Le Mans in a similar fashion, but at Silverstone, with a pre-event BoP change looked stronger. Nevertheless, during the race in the UK, both marques faded away, while Ford, Ferrari and Porsche scrapped for the podium positions. What we don’t have, is one brand running away with it constantly, but work is required to ensure that the racing is a little closer, and produces races similar to last season, which turned out to be memorable.

Alpine vs Jackie Chan DC Racing in LMP2
With three races down, three contenders have emerged in the LMP2 class; Signatech’s Alpine, and the pair of Jackie Chan DC Racing ORECAs. Alpine’s win at Le Mans after G-Drive’s post-race disqualification has left the French team in the driving seat to take the title. But Andre Negrao, Nicolas Lapierre and Pierre Thiriet don’t have a comfortable lead, as a 1-2 finish by Jackie Chan DC Racing at Silverstone has put the No.38 ORECA of Gabriel Aubrey, Ho-Pin Tung and Stephane Richelmi in with a real chance.

WECHere’s hoping that the LMP2 title fight turns out to be as enthralling as last year, when after Le Mans, Rebellion Racing and Jackie Chan DC Racing’s top ORECAs slogged it out for the title towards the end of the season.

Proton pulls away in Am
In GTE Am, it is a different story. In the class, which has arguably provided the most entertaining racing this season so far, Proton Competition is running away with the title. A win at Le Mans, and at Silverstone has given Christian Ried, Julien Andlauer and Matt Campbell and comfortable 33-point lead in the class. The trio, who pilot the No.77 Proton Porsche 911 RSR will hope to continue to finish ahead of their rivals at Clearwater Racing; Keita Sawa, Matt Griffin and Weng Sun Mok.

WECProject 1 Racing are third, after a quiet, but encouraging run through the opening races of the season leaving Egidio Perfetti, Jorg Bergmeister and Patrick Lindsey 35 points back. The German team, which is new to the FIA WEC, almost won at Silverstone, and certainly looks as well-oiled of a team as is required to string podium finishes together before the end of the season.

Travel Destinations can help you enjoy some of the FIA WEC races track-side during this “Super Season”. As well as Le Mans 2019, Travel Destinations also have exclusive offers for the rounds at Sebring and Spa-Francorchamps.

Written by Stephen Kilbey
Photography by Dailysportscar